Creating the Future
HFA-Symposia
© Oliver Killig

Medicine 4.0 — Organic electron­ics in modern medicine

Sympo­sium 2017

"Science has arrived where Star Trek has stopped"

Public event highlights poten­tials and fields of appli­ca­tion of organic electron­ics in medicine.

On July 6, 2017 the third sympo­sium of the Hector Fellow Academy took place in Dresden. The public event on "Medicine 4.0 — Organic Electron­ics in Modern Medicine" was organized in cooper­a­tion with the Dresden Univer­sity of Technol­ogy and attracted numer­ous visitors to the Deutsches Hygiene-Museum Dresden on Thurs­day evening.

Nearly 200 partic­i­pants, among them invited guests from politics, science and indus­try, as well as affected people, doctors and inter­ested citizens, were able to gain insight into the poten­tial and appli­ca­tion fields of organic electron­ics in medicine.

Prof. Dr. Eberhart Zrenner, Hector Fellow and senior profes­sor for ophthal­mol­ogy at the Werner Reichardt Center for Integra­tive Neuro­sciences in Tübin­gen guided through the evening filled with excit­ing lectures and lively discus­sions. The event was opened with the welcome of the Rector of the TU Dresden, Prof. Dr. Hans Müller-Stein­hagen, as well as the Secre­tary of State Uwe Gaul, who deliv­ered the speech of the Saxon State Minis­ter for Science and Art, Dr. Eva-Maria Stange.

To the videos of the welcome and greetings.

Prof. Dr. Karl Leo, Hector Fellow and Head of the Dresden Integrated Center for Applied Physics and Photonic Materi­als (IAPP) at TU Dresden, gave inter­est­ing insights into the field of organic electron­ics and showed the great poten­tial of this technol­ogy for various fields of appli­ca­tion. The technolo­gies devel­oped in Dresden are already found today in mobile phone displays. In addition, his group is currently inves­ti­gat­ing new, flexi­ble organic solar cells. In the medical field, organic electron­ics opens up great oppor­tu­ni­ties for the devel­op­ment of innov­a­tive implants, such as the novel retina implant, in which Karl Leo is currently research­ing in an inter­dis­ci­pli­nary project with Eberhart Zrenner, funded by the HFA.

 

Moder­a­tion

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult.

Eberhart Zrenner

Medicine, Biology & Engineering

Disziplinen Eberhart ZrennerHector Fellow since 2012

   

Organic electron­ics

New appli­ca­tions

In his talk, Hector Fellow Prof. Dr. Karl Leo will provide inter­est­ing insights into the field of organic electron­ics and demon­strate the great poten­tial of this technol­ogy for a wide range of applications.

Video in German

   

In the follow­ing lecture, Prof. Dr. George Malliaras, Head of the Bioelec­tron­ics Division (BEL) at the École des Mines de Saint-Étienne in France, explained the use of organic electron­ics to inter­face with the brain. The devel­op­ment of novel technolo­gies for the inter­fac­ing with the brain promises a better under­stand­ing of brain functions and thus a great advance in the diagno­sis and treat­ment of numer­ous patholo­gies such as Parkinson's disease or epilepsy. Thus, for example, George Malliaras has already success­fully worked to make the measure­ments of brain activ­i­ties non- or minimally invasive, while at the same time ensur­ing the highest accuracy in the local­iza­tion of the affected neurons.

   

Inter­fac­ing with the Brain using Organic Electronics

Profes­sor George Malliaras, Head of the Bioelec­tron­ics Division (BEL) at the École des Mines de Saint-Étienne in France, explains the use of organic electron­ics to inter­face with the brain.

   

Prof. Dr. Thomas Stieglitz, Profes­sor of Biomed­ical Microtech­nol­ogy at the Albert-Ludwigs-Univer­sity of Freiburg, subse­quently demon­strated the great poten­tial of polymer-based inter­faces to the nervous system. In his speech, he presented fields of appli­ca­tion such as intel­li­gent implants and "feeling" prosthe­ses. In addition, he explained the function of novel methods for lower­ing blood pressure, which instead of using drugs work with targeted electri­cal stimu­la­tions of the pressure sensors in the blood vessels. Thomas Stieglitz, however, also made it clear that the devel­op­ment of these promis­ing new technolo­gies simul­ta­ne­ously requires a discourse on ethical and societal conse­quences and is associ­ated with some challenges.

   

Polymer-based inter­faces to the nervous system

Thomas Stieglitz, Profes­sor of Biomed­ical Micro­engi­neer­ing at the Albert Ludwigs Univer­sity of Freiburg, will demon­strate the great poten­tial of polymer-based inter­faces to the nervous system in his presentation.

Video in German

   

In the final discus­sion there was an excit­ing exchange with the audience, in which the previ­ously presented topics were further deepened and additional perspec­tives were illumi­nated. The numer­ous and very diverse questions of the audience empha­sized the relevance of the subject area and the great poten­tial but also unresolved issues in the use of organic electron­ics in medicine.

In order to foster the dialogue between science and society, the Hector Fellow Academy annually organizes a sympo­sium, which deals with the central questions of our time and bridges the gap between current research topics and societal challenges. The next sympo­sium of the Hector Fellow Academy will take place on July 19, 2018 in cooper­a­tion with the LMU Munich and the Max Planck Insti­tute for Quantum Optics on the topic "Quantum Science & Technology".

   

Image gallery

Prof. Dr.

George Malliaras

Bioelec­tron­ics

Head of Bioelec­tron­ics (BEL) at the École des Mines de Saint-Étienne in France

Prof. Dr.

Thomas Stieglitz

Biomed­ical Microtechnology

Profes­sor for Biomed­ical Microtech­nol­ogy at the Albert-Ludwigs-Univer­sity Freiburg

Prof. Dr.

Karl Leo

Physics

Hector Fellow since 2013Disziplinen Karl Leo

   

Bilder­ga­lerie